Glaciers, ciders, blow-outs and the helping hand of Wayland Smithy

Having been blown about for a few hours it was time to return to the car but not before I took a look at The Manger.  An incredibly steep and beautiful valley formed during the las ice-age.  In fact you can see the markings on the walls of the valley which show how the ice melted away.

Brave cows!

Brave cows!

It is also home to some vertigo loving cows and apparently at night the Whitehorse of Uffington comes down here to graze, it is certainly big enough.  Normally slopes of this steepness would be grazed by sheep and I saw a flock or two round the other side.

The Manger and me

The Manger and me

On our way back home we took a few detours through some charming villages and towns and stopped off to have some traditional west-country style cider, us being just a few miles from Wiltshire and the start of the west-country.

Thatchers Cider

Thatchers Cider – It’s a little known fact that Mrs Thatcher was a great cider brewer…. or maybe not!

Having done almost a loop, we were were again just a mile or two away from Waylands Smithy when our car tyre exploded and we were left marooned in the middle of nowhere and without a spare tyre due to it being a leased vehicle.

A totally ruptured tyre

A totally ruptured tyre

It was entirely possible that we could have been waiting there for 3 or 4 hours on a Saturday night far from anywhere but I think my faith in Wayland the magical smithy who would re-shoe your horse overnight bore fruit as incredibly a repair man came to us in less than an hour.

Watching the sun go down

Watching the sun go down

As the repairs were put in place, I stood and watched the sun set as travellers have done here for 8,000 years.

About Stephen Liddell

I am a writer and traveller with a penchant for history and getting off the beaten track. With several books to my name including a #1 seller, I also write environmental, travel and history articles for magazines as well as freelance work. Recently I've appeared on BBC Radio and Bloomberg TV and am waiting on the filming of a ghost story on British TV. I run my own private UK tours company (Ye Olde England Tours) with small, private and totally customisable guided tours run by myself!
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2 Responses to Glaciers, ciders, blow-outs and the helping hand of Wayland Smithy

  1. Contractions of Fate says:

    Despite all the hardships you’ve experienced this year due to the virus and the lack of government support, I must say I do still slightly envy your life! The wondrous sights you have seen, and shared with us in your blog are magnificent! I wish I was still fit enough to hitch hike round the country as I did 35 years ago. Sadly, I cannot even drive now.

    But no spare tyre/wheel in a leased car? That’s pretty whack!

    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad you are still enjoying my blog. The content has changed a little bit due to everything that is going on but hopefully there will be more location posts next year! I’m sorry that you’re not able to get out any more. Yes, it’s crazy but apparently its now almost a standard policy. We were lucky to get home that night.

      Like

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